We’re barely into February 2018, and, McDonald’s Canada just dropped one of the most creative and successful ad campaigns of the year!

Big Mac in Canada turns 50 this year, and to help celebrate this icon of fast food with a new twist, we worked with Cossette Toronto and McDonald’s Canada to bring back the Big Mac Bacon as a limited menu item.

To generate curiosity and anticipation across the country, unbranded billboards with Carlyle Routh’s photography just had a date and a logo – “BMxB”. Though ambiguous, the stylish black and white images were a clear nod towards the world of fashion. Furthermore, the photos were supported by cryptic videos which ran during the broadcast of the Grammy’s last Sunday, with an Anna Wintour-esque personality promising “a collaboration” and “the combination of two greats.” The “x” had a whiff of creative collaboration, de rigueur in today’s music, giving rise to wild speculations from a Bruno Mars x Beyonce collaboration to a new clothing line for Drake.

McDonalds Canada BMxB Carlyle Routh

Photo Credit: Carlyle Routh

 

McDonalds Canada BMxB Carlyle Routh

Photo Credit: Carlyle Routh

 

 

On 30th January, the ads were revealed to show that “BMxB” in fact stood for “Big Mac x Bacon” and Carlyle Routh’s  photos un-cropped to show each of the models holding the burger of honour! The images were also used in a BMxB playlist on Spotify just in case you needed a McD-approved soundtrack while going to your favourite golden arches restaurant.

McDonalds Canada BMxB Carlyle Routh

Photo Credit: Carlyle Routh

 

McDonalds Canada BMxB Carlyle Routh

Photo Credit: Carlyle Routh

 

Beyond the brilliant photography of Carlyle Routh, FUZE Reps was proud to be responsible for the production of this photoshoot and its details, from location scouting to casting. #fuzeproductions

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Congratulations to the team at The Kit (Laura DeCarufel, Jessica Hotson, Rani Sheen, Sonya Van Heyningen, Kristy Wright) and our Hamin Lee for snagging the Best Beauty Still Life for 2017!

 

Hamin Lee and his studio have always a wide range of work, from lifestyle to automobiles, but it is the colourful, abstract still life and off-figure work that are the most eye-catching and memorable. See below for the winning, super detailed set, featuring travel minis in “Beautify in Palm Springs“.

 

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The Cannes Lions was just last week (17 – 23 June 2017) but we’re still over the moon about Arash Moallemi‘s shoot with IKEA Canada winning a couple of Lions, and social media mentions from FastCo, Mashable, Huffington Post, Design Boom (and even the official Cannes Lions Twitter!).

This unbelievable response to Cook This Page, was led by Anthony Chelvanathan of Leo Burnett Toronto, so naturally we called up Arash to find out what the process was like, and to share some behind the scenes shots :

“It was a standalone, one day shoot where we had to execute every recipe in the book in both motion and stills. To keep it tight, we made sure the set was optimized to shoot both genres at the same time.

It almost didn’t happen, because the ink had to be food safe but a printer finally pulled through and everything fell into place. A year of planning had gone into this so on the day of the shoot, Anthony C and Lisa G knew exactly what they were looking for and the direction the shoot had to go in. For me, I didn’t have to guess and it was easy to set up for the next shot and so on. It was plain execution, no need to “figure it out”. On the day of the shoot we let the wood surface set the tone for the overall feel.

What makes me happiest is delivering on Anthony’s “baby”. As a commercial DP and photographer, my job is to realize my clients goal and this is an example where it went really well.”

Content has been condensed and edited for brevity. 

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If you’ve been following us on all the usual social channels, you’ll know that we’ve launched IN:FUZE! This is FUZE Reps’s latest extension to develop up-and-coming talent. We welcome Jeff Carlson and Chris Robinson to the family! See a sample of their work below. Better yet, check out fuzereps.com for all the freshness.

Below: Jeff CARLSON’s sparkling still life and off figure work.

 

Below: Chris Robinson got our attention with his punchy, humorous composition and edits.

 

 

It was hot, sweaty and windy. Arash Moallemi had flown down to Dallas for the State Fair of Texas to shoot an engine prototype for Ford, unsure of what he was walking into.

Pierre Bourjo, had recently accepted a new project for to create an interactive 3D model. The idea for Ford’s new engine prototype seemed simple enough – tap and zoom in with your fingers to see details from all angles of an object suspended in space. And then you find out there are no blueprints, no references, but the only physical prototype in North America was somewhere in Dallas for show. To somehow bring back all the details, Pierre figured photogrammetry was the solution. Simply put photogrammetry is a process of creating a digital model from hundreds of photographs.

When Arash arrived, the engine was under a tent on grass. He had a couple of hours to shoot before the fair began, keeping in mind all the supporting plates Pierre will require to build the animation. Arash said, “The engine was on a podium that didn’t spin. So this meant that we had to mark our distances and shoot around it in 360….It was a challenging shoot as technically I had to do my best to be perfect, but the engine was crooked (as it was sitting on grass), the wind was crazy high and kept ripping up the background paper and knocking it down. It was so hot and humid even this Middle Eastern boy had to take a water break between each set of images. [Finally] Got all the images in the bag, just in time for the fair to open.”

 

 

The solution of photogrammetry was a little risky – would any parts be missing or incomplete? There was no opportunity to reshoot. Armed with tons of visual references, Pierre started to build. To produce a fully controllable model with fleshed out details, he created some sculpts but also entirely recreated all details, so it was clear and precise when viewed at various angles, or zoomed in.

He says, “In the span of a few weeks, I processed the base shape of the 3D engine from the photographs, modelled additional parts by hand and fine tuned the textures to ensure everything was optimized for real time interaction. The client was able to carefully inspect the 3D model onscreen throughout the process and I made the necessary changes to reflect the product accurately.

Over 1 million polygons later and after perfecting the high resolution texture maps, the result is one of the most detailed interactive model we have seen of its kind. Just a perfect engine in space. It’s always rewarding to push new technology to its limits with a successful outcome!”

 

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